Lab trip to Canadian Centre for Inland Waters

Hats off to Environment Canada, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, and the Canadian Coast Guard for putting on a great open house today at the Canadian Centre for Inland Waters (CCIW)!  Most of my lab (see picture below) agreed to a “lab outing” to the CCIW.  I had always wanted to see what research occurs at CCIW, which is a building nestled directly under the Burlington Skyway in southern Ontario:

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With the yoke of information control (http://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/when-science-goes-silent/) lifted following the election of a new government in 2015 (http://www.macleans.ca/society/unmuzzled-government-scientists-ready-to-discuss-a-decade-of-work/), it was amazing to see the enthusiasm in the faces of the scientists working hard to assess environmental impacts of human influences on wildlife, plants, and the ecosystems around us.  Why these scientists were ever bureaucratically muzzled is beyond me.

Here we are looking pleased with ourselves:

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Most of the lab in attendance.  From Left to Right: Justin Bridgeman, Nicholas Skakich, Glenn Tattersall, Curtis Abney, and Philip Bartel.  Susan Wang not in photo as she was still having conversations with researchers inside the building.

We even receive visitors badges that reminded me of a strange 1980s sci-fi show:

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On the trip home, we even were stopped by the lift bridge, something I usually avoid when driving the QEW:

 

All told, I was extremely impressed with the open house put on by CCIW and wish to thank them for opening their doors to the public.  Keep up the good work!

Good news in the lab

A couple of significant events occurred in the past couple of weeks in the lab, and I wanted to note them here.

My MSc student, Curtis Abney found out he is a recipient of an Ontario Graduate Scholarship for his research on the thermal biology of garter snakes.  Congratulations, Curtis!

My MSc student, Justin Bridgeman, who is busy attending conferences this summer, received a travel support fellowship to attend the Fisheries Society of the British Isles annual meeting this July!  Congratulations, Justin!

 

Chimney Swifts in Infrared

Last month, Canadian Nuclear Laboratories invited a number of researchers to witness the nightly roosting of chimney swifts in one of their ventilation stacks!  They were kind enough to allow me to film using my thermal camera the gathering of over 1000 birds at ~8:45pm one evening.  Now, if only I can find the time to help with writing code to help them count the birds entering the chimney!  Here is a brief video and a link to CNL’s facebook site:

A successful defence for Susan Wang!

Congratulations to Susan Wang, MSc student working in my lab and co-supervised with Dr. Janet Koprivnikar (Ryerson University) for successfully defending her thesis on:

“Behavioural Thermoregulation and Energetics in Two Intermediate Hosts of Trematode Parasites”

Thank you for all members of the examining committee for their hard work and interesting defence discussions:

External Examiner: Dr. Carl Lowenberger, Simon Fraser University

Committee Members: Dr. Gaynor Spencer, Dr. Robert Carlone, Dr. Dorina Szuroczki

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Two proud supervisors (Koprivnikar, middle, Tattersall, right) and a new MSc student (Susan Wang, left)

Her time in the lab was far too short, but we are proud of her accomplishments and for her hard work on an interesting project.  Because of Susan, I can safely say that we can readily do interdisciplinary research!  Ecological physiology of disease and host:parasite interactions is a fun topic and I’m glad to have had this project taking place in my lab and grateful for Janet Koprivnikar for funding, intellectual, and logistic support, collaboration, and supervision at every step.

Rattlesnake Hibernation Research

Brock University’s Brock News has written up a great piece on Anne Yagi’s (an MSc student in my lab) research.  Anne has worked for the Ministry of Natural Resources for a number of years and joined my lab to pursue questions into the overwintering physiology of snakes.  The article below covers the Conservation Physiological approach she has been taking to understand neonatal rattlesnakes in a sensitive population.  Hopefully we’ll be publishing on this soon.  Congratulations Anne!

https://brocku.ca/brock-news/2017/05/brock-research-helps-reverse-rattlesnakes-death-rate/